Irma Landfall Update, 8-Sept

Our coupled models, initialized at 8pm on September 7th, have completed and are now able to resolve Irma making landfall in Florida sometime between 2am and 5am Sunday morning.  As a result, both the 3 and 7 day runs are capable of resolving the storm and currently point the landfall as occurring between Miami and Homestead (where Andrew made landfall in August 1992)….

Irma 7-Day Forecast Updates (Sept 6 and 7)

Over the last few days, the 7-day forecast experiment upgrade has been working well.  Our output from forecasts initialized on the 6th and 7th are largely in line with the forecast models that the National Hurricane Center (NHC) has been favoring in their forecast tracks.  We have been utilizing additional resources provided by the High Performance Computing (HPC) center at NC State…

For Irma, the First Ever 7-Day CNAPS Forecast

Over the last few weeks, we have been working to expand the current CNAPS forecast from 3 to 7 days.  With the appearance of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, and the peak of the hurricane season on September 10, we were graciously allocated additional computing power from the High Performance Computing (HPC) Center at North Carolina State University to perform some experimental simulations of…

How Oceanographic Model Coupling Works

Model coupling is the connection of several separate numerical models so that output from each model becomes input for the other models. Models exchange information at specified intervals, so that, for example, predictions about the weather affect and are affected by ocean surface temperature, sea surface roughness, heat flux, etc. This allows a more complete and realistic description of ocean conditions than…

How Oceanographic Models Are Made

Models of ocean conditions are numerical predictions of what the ocean is like at a given time, based on inputs and known physics. The inputs are observations from satellites, moorings, tidal gauges, high-frequency radar stations, and buoys, among other sources. This information is collected daily and fed into the model. The model takes this new data, along with model estimates from the…

OOMG Teaches Weddington Middle Schoolers About Oceanography

Approximately 250 eighth grade students from Weddington Middle School (near Charlotte, NC) began their three-day field trip to NC’s Outer Banks with a marine science presentation by OOMG scientists at NC State University’s James B. Hunt, Jr. Library. On March 29, graduate student Laura McGee, Lab Manager Jennifer Warrillow, and Research Assistant Professor Joe Zambon introduced the students to their research in…

Coffee and Viz Presentation at Hunt Library, NCSU

NOAA hurricane animation

Roy He and Ben Johnson presented a seminar on ocean forecasting with OOMG’s CNAPS model at NCSU’s Hunt Library on October 14, 2016. In the Coffee and Viz seminar series, researchers use the Teaching and Visualization Lab’s 270 degrees of screen to envelop the audience with dynamic images of state-of-the-art research. Roy explained the steps involved in creating a model and how…

CNAPS Model Launched

CNAPS model output

The new Coupled Northwest Atlantic Prediction System (CNAPS) web site allows users to interact with the group’s ocean model of past, present, and three-day future ocean states. Expanding the domain of the SABGOM model, CNAPS covers the ocean from Nova Scotia to Venezuela and west in the north Atlantic, and includes marine weather, ocean waves, ocean circulation, and model validation. In the role…

GoMRI Science Featured at the Bush Presidential Library and Museum

An interactive exhibit at the Bush Presidential Library and Museum, located at Texas A&M University, allows visitors to “Make Your Own Oil Spill.” Visitors can “spill” oil in the Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic Bight by tapping a touch-screen display, then watch the program map the dispersal of the oil based on bathymetry, currents, and winds. The visualization is part of…

Gulf of Mexico Drifter Tracker

This display animates the NCSU SABGOM model-simulated trajectories of surface floats released within the South Atlantic Bight and the Gulf of Mexico on the day of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill (April 20, 2010) and where they would drift for the following six months. To see the trajectory of a surface float, click a starting location within the light shaded area in…