Ocean Acoustics: Communicating with Instruments Sitting on the Seafloor

The bottom-mounted research instruments utilized by Processes Driving Exchange at Cape Hatteras (PEACH) scientists sit anywhere from 20 meters to more than 3000 meters beneath the surface of the ocean. These instruments measure the entire water column above using a variety of remote and in situ methods of data collection. With exception to 2 moorings utilizing surface-based meteorological instruments, there is no…

R/V Neil Armstrong Science Operations Begin

OOMG members Dr. Joe Zambon (Research Assistant Professor), Shun Mao (Ph.D. Student) and the rest of the multi-institutional Processes Driving Exchange at Cape Hatteras (PEACH) team arrived in their study region and science operations began. While the R/V Neil Armstrong has been recording important scientific data since leaving the dock in Woods Hole, MA, the first in situ measurements of the study…

Departure of the R/V Neil Armstrong

OOMG members Dr. Joe Zambon (Research Assistant Professor), Shun Mao (Ph.D. Student) and the rest of the multi-institutional Processes Driving Exchange at Cape Hatteras (PEACH) team departed from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute dock at Woods Hole, MA early Saturday morning. Their trip to the continental shelf break off of North Carolina is expected to take approximately 40 hours as the R/V…

OOMG Scientists Dr. Joe Zambon and Shun Mao arrive at the R/V Neil Armstrong

OOMG members Dr. Joe Zambon (Research Assistant Professor) and Shun Mao (Ph.D. Student) arrived at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute (WHOI) to board the R/V Neil Armstrong early Thursday morning. They are taking part in the final cruise of the NSF-funded Processes Driving Exchange at Cape Hatteras (PEACH). Upon their arrival, they checked in with the Chief Scientist for this expedition (AR-33),…

OOMG attends Annual SECOORA Meeting

This week OOMG members Roy He, Joe Zambon, and Jennifer Warrillow attended the 2018 SECOORA Meeting in Charleston, SC.  Tuesday, Roy presented a talk on CNAPS model development, advances in data assimilation, and improving model resolution.  Roy was also presented with a gift as his tenure on the SECOORA board came to an end after 6 years. Wednesday, Joe gave a talk on his SECOORA…

CTDs Underway on the R/V Neil Armstrong

Station map for 1st cross-section in January 2018 PEACH cruise.

After the successful recovery and refurbishment of several bottom profilers, moorings, and surface buoys, the first transect of the PEACH (Processes Driving Exchange at Cape Hatteras; NSF Award: 1559476) cruise was undertaken this evening and into the early morning hours.  The transect spaced 7 stations along 60km of ocean from a few kilometers off of the NC Outer Banks to the continental shelf break.  To collect sub-surface data, scientists utilized shipboard CTD, the…

PEACH Cruise Underway

Dr. Joe Zambon and over a dozen scientists and PIs making up the PEACH (Processes Driving Exchange at Cape Hatteras; NSF Award #1559476) project departed the frozen waters of Woods Hole, MA on Monday morning (8-January) for Cape Hatteras onboard the R/V Neil Armstrong.  The first day of travel was difficult with high seas and crashing waves.  The anticipated transit time is 36 hours from Woods Hole, MA to…

Second PEACH Cruise Soon to be Underway

On Saturday, Dr. Joe Zambon arrived in New England to board the R/V Neil Armstrong for a journey down to offshore Cape Hatteras, NC.  The study is part of the PEACH, Processes Driving Exchange at Cape Hatteras, grant sponsored by NSF (Award: 1559476).  The next day will be spent mobilizing and retrofitting equipment onto the vessel for meteorological rawindsonde balloon deployments, a first…

Test Radiosonde Launch

Joe an dradiosonde balloon

OOMG member Dr. Joe Zambon tested a balloon-carried radiosonde with the help of NCSU’s Dr. Matt Parker from the roof of Jordan Hall. After filling the large balloon with helium, Joe and Matt zip-tied it closed, then attached the unwinder. Between the balloon and the radiosonde, the unwinder gently spools out 10 m of string so that the radiosonde is far enough…

Hurricane Irma Siphons Water Away from West Florida Coast

An interesting phenomena has been observed in the wake of Hurricane Irma as it moves along the west Florida coastline.  Several images have been put on social media of water drastically receding away from the coastline, whereas tropical storms usually result in surge as they make landfall. This phenomenon is largely due to 2 factors.  First, the winds ahead of Irma are…