Laura McGee Wins Grand Prize at Climate Lightning Talks

Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences (MEAS) PhD Student and OOMG member Laura McGee delivered a talk at the first ever Climate Lightning Talks: Apocalypse Now? How Extreme Weather is Affecting the Southeast and the Globe. Her talk was titled, “Hurricanes Cause Asymmetric Phytoplankton Blooms” and explained how phytoplankton activity is enhanced along the right side of hurricane tracks in the North Hemisphere.

Laura McGee delivers Lightning talk on the asymmetry of phytoplankton blooms along hurricane tracks.

Laura McGee delivers a talk about the asymmetry of phytoplankton blooms along hurricane tracks.

McGee won the Grand Prize after a warm reception by the audience. The Lightning Talks were hosted by USGS Southeast Climate Science Center & NC State University and were held at the David Clark Labs Auditorium.

The event featured twelve speakers from eight departments spread throughout the university. The talks spanned topics from the intricacies of geophysical fluid dynamics to intergenerational conversations about climate change. Speakers ranged from professors to postdoctoral associates to graduate students. The complete list included:

Robert Scheller, Dept. Forestry and Environmental Resources
Ted Simons, Dept. of Applied Ecology
Danielle Lawson, Dept. of Parks, Recreation, & Tourism Management
Laura McGee, Dept. of Marine, Earth, and Atmospheric Sciences
Bill Hoffmann, Dept. of Plant and Microbial Biology
Samuel Flake, Dept. Plant and Microbial Biology
Eleanor Lahr, Dept. of Entomology & Plant Pathology
James Madden, Dept. of Marine, Earth, and Atmospheric Sciences
Zamani Atefeh, Dept. of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering
Yuhao Ba, Dept. of Public Administration
Okan Pala, Center for Geospatial Analytics
Bethany Cutts, Dept. of Parks, Recreation, & Tourism Management

James Madden NCSU

James Madden delivers a talk about the Raleigh flood of 2016.

Fellow MEAS participant James Madden gave a talk explaining how future extreme rainfall events similar to the storm that flooded Crabtree Creek in Raleigh on July 16th, 2016 could be affected and enhanced by climate change.

For more information please contact lightning.secsc@gmail.com.

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